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Book Notes

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Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why

In Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why journalist Laurence Gonzales combines his own personal adventure history with time spent with white water rafting experts, mountaineers, fighter jet pilots, and wilderness survival guides to understand how people survive (or fail to survive) in extreme wilderness situations like plane crashes,

Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
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Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World

I’ve always seen myself as someone with a ton of interests, with a lot of useful skills and knowledge but not a world class expert in anything. And while that’s served me really well, I sometimes wonder if it puts me at a disadvantage. Fortunately for me, I

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World
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Book Notes on the Fuzzy and the Techie

I just finished Scott Hartley’s new book The Fuzzy and the Techie: Why the Liberal Arts Will Rule the Digital World. It is an inspiring read full of compelling stories and ideas about the rapidly evolving world around us. The central thesis of the book is that instead pushing

Book Notes on the Fuzzy and the Techie
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Remote: Office Not Required

I just finished reading Remote: Office Not Required, by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson, partners at 37Signals. It’s a great read and here’s the  basic premise: In today’s economy, the quest for talent is so great that organizations can no longer afford to merely look at

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The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future

Today, we’re taking a look at the book The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future by Kevin Kelly. I really enjoyed this book and if you work in technology or even have a passing interest in how technology will shape our world in the

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future
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Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging

I recently finished reading Sebastian Junger’s excellent new book Tribes: on Homecoming and Belonging. It’s a slim volume that addresses something really important: how hardship builds group cohesion and solidarity. In my keynote speech at the PRCA conference, I spoke about I believe is the most critical factor

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
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Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook

Today I’m sharing the insights I gleaned from a wonderful (and fairly short) book Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook. The Book in a Nutshell: Choosing a name for your startup or product is a crucial task because it defines the initial expectations and preconceived notions people

Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook
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The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age

My reading notes The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age by Reid Hoffman, Ben Casnocha and Chris Yeh. This is a book about rethinking the relationship between employees and employers. I’d say the audience is primarily executives and managers, well as HR leaders. Both as an employee and

The Alliance: Managing Talent in the Networked Age
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The Little Book of Talent

Five years ago, I stood in a bookstore for about an hour and read half of a wonderful book called The Talent Code by Daniel Coyne. It had come out around the same time as a few other books in a similar vein of developing expertise and 10,000 hours

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The Success Equation, Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing.

These reading notes began life as an “Ignite-style” 5 minute presentation with slides automatically progressing every 15 seconds — which I gave on a Monday morning presentation for Percolate. The words below are essentially what I said during that talk. The Success Equation, Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and