In my final Your Turn Challenge post, and part of the #WkofBks series I did this week, I’m going to look at a fantastic book on creating, organizing, and managing the words, images, and media of our world. It’s called The Elements of Content Strategy.

9815847The Book in a Nutshell: Content strategy is a discipline that stems from a family of fields including marketing, editorial, and curation, and requires analytical, organizational, and creative skills to successfully execute.

About the Author: Erin Kissane is an editor for Contents magazine and Source, a community site for journalists who code. She was previously a content strategist for Brain Traffic and edited A List Apart magazine. The book is part of the A Book Apart series, which includes many concise books that are densely packed with wisdom. Continue reading

This is Day 4 of the #WkofBks series I’m doing as part of the Your Turn Challenge. Today, I’m sharing thoughts from the book How Google Works, which I read over Audible.

how-google-worksAbout the Book in a Nutshell: Technology (including the internet and the smartphone) has dramatically reshaped the way business operates, both internally and externally, and what make Google successful was its relentless focus on hiring “smart creatives” and then giving them a lot of room to move fast, make decisions, and focus improving outcomes for the user.

About the Authors: Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg are two long-time executives at Google. Eric was formerly the CEO of a technology company called Novell before serving as CEO of Google from 2001 to 2011 while Jonathan Rosenberg was hired into Google in 2002 (after twice declining an offer to work there) and as SVP of Product, worked on Ads, Gmail, Android, and Chrome before stepping down in 2011 as SVP of Product. Continue reading

Welcome to Day 3 of my #WkofBooks, part of the Your Turn Challenge. Today I’m sharing the insights I gleaned from a wonderful (and fairly short) book Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook.

dontcallitthatThe Book in a Nutshell: Choosing a name for your startup or product is a crucial task because it defines the initial expectations and preconceived notions people will have about your thing. It’s easy to pick a bland name, but really try hard to think up a lot of name options and pick something weird, differentiated, and memorable.

About the Author: Eli Altman is the Creative Director of a naming company called A Hundred Monkeys (good name right?) which has worked with startups and Fortune 50 companies to name products. For example, they helped a wearable tech company called Pulsetracker rebrand to Basis. Continue reading

These are my reading notes on How to Make Sense of Any Mess, and the second installment of #WkofBks as part of the #YourTurnChallenge!

how-to-make-sense

The Book in a Nutshell: The human race is creating more information than ever before, in the form of signs, articles, websites, apps, and much more — and the world would be a better place if we could all learn a little bit more about how to structure, present, and discuss that information. Also one of the inspirations for How to Get What You Want.

About the Author: I first encountered Abby Covert via a presentation she did with the same name as part of the Blend 2014 conference. She’s the President of the Information Architecture Institute and teaches IA at the Parsons New School of Design. I loved her story-driven, no-nonsense approach to writing about this field. Continue reading