I came across this website, which asks you to preserve what you consider humanity’s most important knowledge in one sentence. Examples include – F=Ma, No Such Thing as a Free Lunch, and the 3 Laws of Thermodynamics.

The postings lead me to the KEO website, where messages are accepted to be loaded on to a satellite that will crash back into the Earth in 50,000 years.

In their words:

The faraway children, of your children … of their great-grand children … who you would never know … would love to know you. What would you like to tell them?

I’d like to tell them this:

It is hard to put in to words the reflections and revelations I have had in my twenty (20) short years of life on this planet. I hardly remember half of them anyways. But I will try.
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This is an article I had originally written for a Seed Magazine science writing competition, but I missed the deadline.  Well, turns out it was almost done.  So I just wrapped it up and I’m putting it out here.


Science is more important in our lives than ever before. We use produces created from scientific discoveries every day. And scientific issues are always in the news. Our economy is driven largely by scientific businesses: biotech, information technology, energy. The rate of scientific development in America, and the world, has rocketed. The last few decades have seen unprecedented numbers of scientific and technological advances, and there is no sign it will be slowing down any time soon. Continue reading

The paradox of the human body is that we are such powerful, yet such frail creatures.

Our bodies are capable of incredible feats of strength, flexibility, speed, endurance and power. Just think of olympic weightlifting, contorsionists, sprinters, Lance Armstrong, and karate masters breaking concrete. The things we can do with our bodies should we train ourselves for them, are simply amazing.

At the same time, we are truly frail and sometimes pathetics creatures, especially when you compare us to other animals. We have no exoskeleton, we have no claws or sharp teeth. The same bones that can break concrete when properly applied, can also snap from a simple fall.

What this all comes down to is that we need to respect our bodies. It is often called a machine, a machine that needs proper tuning and oiling to run well. The best part of the human body is that, unlike a car, when you hurt yourself, time can heal the injury. Try doing that with your dented fender.

I guess I’m thinking about this topic because as I get older, I’m facing up to a lot more injuries, even as I increase my ability to perform skills. My back hurts, my shoulder is bothering me. I’m just trying to stay healthy for 2 more years.

The Takeaway: Respect your body, and it will do great things.

What is the future of science in America? What should the US do to preserve and build upon its role as a leader in scientific innovation?

http://seedmagazine.com/writingcontest/ 

This is an important question, and I would like to write something about it, as it pertains greatly to my blog.  I'll be considering it throughout this week, and hopefully publish something on Friday.  Some thoughts for now:

  • How can we maintain the level of scientific innovation?
  • What should be do about declining engineers and scientists?
  • What can better science education do to solve this?
  • What can better public awareness of science do?
  • How can we make grade school teaching a more prestigious and rewarding occupation?
  • How do get our government to make scientifically sound decisions?

 There are a lot of things to consider, but I think we can and we will do it.

PS I watched some videos of Al Gore on the 2000 campaign.  Just broke my heart, especially after seeing An Inconvenient Truth.  God I wish he had become president.