I’ve been messing around with a site called Askolo, which allows you to ask questions of smart, interesting people like Alexis Ohanian (cofounder of Reddit), Mark Bao (creator of threewords.me) and Paul Graham (Y Combinator founder). It’s like the structure of Formspring with the content quality of Quora.

Here’s a question I was asked and then answered:

Q: What was your team’s inspiration for starting Ridejoy?

A: I’ll tell you a bit about our background because it shows what we’re trying to do with Ridejoy:

I met Kalvin in college while working on a nonprofit and later became roommates in San Francisco. We were living in a 3 bedroom and need to find a roommate, but didn’t just want a random stranger. We found our third roommate (and future cofounder) Randy via a site we had built called http://jasonandkalvin.com. After living together for a year and becoming good friends while working at separate startups, we felt the time was right to start something new and build something meaningful together.

We had shared passions around technology, travel and community and our backgrounds led us into rideshare. (Randy had relied numerous times on the kindness of strangers when backpacking through Europe and Asia to share food/housing/rides, Kalvin had recently experienced the unique private transportation networks of East Africa and I have a lot of great memories of long-distance roadtrips with friends: like driving down Route 1 (http://www.jasonshen.com/2011/road-trips-and-taking-the-long-way/)

Just as we used the web to find a roommate we could have a strong connection with, we’ve built Ridejoy to help people travel easily and affordably and with people they could share this great travel experience with. We were very fortunate to go through YC in the summer of 2011 and going to Burning Man (via our rideshare site http://burningmanrides.com) has certainly influenced our outlook on things as well.

We love the fact that this service helps people get where they need to go (usually to see family or friends or significant others) in a cost-effective way (the recession hurts!) while reducing CO2 emissions and creating real-life human connections.

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If  you liked this and want to ask me a question or read my answers to 14 other questions, check me out on Askolo.

Photo credit by stuckincustoms

Photo courtesy of R’eyes.

Whenever someone signs up for my email newsletter, they get a personal email reply from me thanking them for signing up and asking them if there’s something I can do to help them. I get to meet a lot of interesting people that way, learn new things and hopefully provide some value.

A while back I got an email from a reader who works as an analyst at a multi-national bank and asked me this:

Quick question for you. A lot of times I come home from work and I’m too exhausted to work on my side projects. How do you manage your energy to get the most out of your day? – Thanks, Josh

With his permission, I’m reprinting his question and my response. I thought readers of this blog would find in valuable since I find that many of you have very cool side projects that you’re working on.


Great question. I think there is something about people’s baseline energy levels that plays a role here – some people are just naturally more energetic than others. But outside of that, here are a couple ideas to have the energy to work on your side projects:

1) Reduce your commute.

Commutes add a lot of stress to your life and suck up your time. Instead of driving, could you take a bus or train and sleep / work on your project? Or work from home one or two days a week?

2) Wake up earlier.

If you’re tired at night, why not go to sleep earlier and wake up an hour earlier than normal. Take that 1st hour to work on the things that are important to you. It’s like investing in yourself before paying others.

3) Exercise.

Are you working out consistently? I know that if I don’t work out, I can start feeling sluggish and slow. Taking the time to work out might feel like it’s detracting from your time to do stuff, but it can add a lot more spring to your step later on in the day – and if done consistently over time, give you more energy on a regular basis.

4) Quality food.

What kind of food are you eating? I know that when I get stressed, I eat a lot and mostly junk, and it tends to make me feel like crap. Drinking lots of water and eating more fruits and vegetables, and being *slightly* hungry (instead of stuffing yourself) can give you a lot more energy.

5) Energy “vampires”.

There are certain people that we hang out with (boss, coworkers, friends) that can really suck all the life out of you. If you’re hanging out with a vampire, see if you can reduce the time you spend with them or maybe even cut them out of your life.

6) Better projects.

Maybe you’re just not that excited about the side project you’re working on. I know people often will “want to want” something but not actually desire to do it. Be honest with yourself and see if this is something you’re really passionate about doing and enjoy the process.

7) Get a partner.

If you can partner up with someone, it makes the project a lot easier and more enjoyable (if you find the right person). See if there is someone at work, or a friend, or even an online contact who might want to work with you on the things you’re doing. That startup post is 10x better because I coauthored it with another guy, Derek, who I first met on Twitter and now is a really good friend.