The 10x Job Application: What You Do When You Really Want the Gig

We talk a lot about the war for talent: the idea that organizations need to fight to recruit, retain, and grow great people. Harvard Business Review recently put it this way:

“Finding and nurturing ambitious, hard-driving, and international-minded managers and technical staff are major challenges for multinationals and will become ever more crucial. HR operations at many companies have traditionally been seen in terms of compliance, record keeping, and support. But as talent shortages grow more acute in idea-intensive industries, human capital management should become a much higher strategic priority.”

The Future and How to Survive It (HBR October 2015)

But one of the biggest challenges in the war for talent is identifying who those top performers are. Continue reading…


My Reading Notes on Elements of Content Strategy

In my final Your Turn Challenge post, and part of the #WkofBks series I did this week, I’m going to look at a fantastic book on creating, organizing, and managing the words, images, and media of our world. It’s called The Elements of Content Strategy.

9815847The Book in a Nutshell: Content strategy is a discipline that stems from a family of fields including marketing, editorial, and curation, and requires analytical, organizational, and creative skills to successfully execute.

About the Author: Erin Kissane is an editor for Contents magazine and Source, a community site for journalists who code. She was previously a content strategist for Brain Traffic and edited A List Apart magazine. The book is part of the A Book Apart series, which includes many concise books that are densely packed with wisdom. Continue reading…


My Notes on Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook

Welcome to Day 3 of my #WkofBooks, part of the Your Turn Challenge. Today I’m sharing the insights I gleaned from a wonderful (and fairly short) book Don’t Call it That: A Naming Workbook.

dontcallitthatThe Book in a Nutshell: Choosing a name for your startup or product is a crucial task because it defines the initial expectations and preconceived notions people will have about your thing. It’s easy to pick a bland name, but really try hard to think up a lot of name options and pick something weird, differentiated, and memorable.

About the Author: Eli Altman is the Creative Director of a naming company called A Hundred Monkeys (good name right?) which has worked with startups and Fortune 50 companies to name products. For example, they helped a wearable tech company called Pulsetracker rebrand to Basis. Continue reading…

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Book Notes on Your Turn by Seth Godin [#WkofBks]

I love reading books, and but I know I can easily forget what I’ve read if I don’t document the ideas somewhere. Luckily, this blog helps with that. Some book blog posts I’ve done in the past include:

This week, I’ll be publishing a new blog post every single day. Each will share some of the big ideas of good books I’ve read recently. I’m calling it Week of Books (#WkofBks) and it’s part of a global one-week project on shipping called the Your Turn Challenge. The campaign tied to Seth Godin’s new book, Your Turn and led by Winnie Kao.

And since the object at the heart of all this is a book, what better way to kick off this series than with a look at Your Turn.

Your Turn Book Notes

angled-cover_largeThe Book in a Nutshell: There are so many opportunities today to stand up, start something, and make a difference. We no longer have to wait for others to pick us, we can pick ourselves at any time. And we owe it to ourselves and the world to give our gifts tot he world.

About the Author: Seth Godin is one of the smartest, most generous, and most expansive thinking business bloggers I’ve ever encountered. I’ve been reading his blog and books since 2006. Seth has written 17 best-selling books that have been translated into 35 languages, and founded two tech companies: Yoyodyne, sold to Yahoo, and Squidoo, sold to Hubpages. Continue reading…


The Ultimate Guide to Hiring (or Getting Hired as) a Content Marketer

Note: If you’re a phenomenal content marketer based in NYC, my team at Percolate wants to talk to you. Learn more about how we work and ping me if you’ve got any questions.

If you’re a giant consumer brand like Bud Light or Nike, you can afford to invest a ton of money in celebrity endorsements, TV spots, and brand-focused campaigns that put your newest products in front everyone, over and over again. But for many organizations, particularly ones that sell to professionals or businesses, the way to break through is through valuable content that solves problems and brings new insight. Continue reading…