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11 Nifty Javascript and CSS Libraries for Newb Programmers (Like Me)

One of the things that can be surprising to people who don’t spend much time creating software is just how much code is really a giant mashup of pre-existing pieces of code that have been modified to interact with each other. The beauty of software is that it can be used without being consumed, like an idea or a piece of writing, and that’s what makes it so powerful.

In building side projects, I’ve found and used a number of neat Javascript (and CSS) libraries, which are organized bundles of code that perform specific functionality or style websites in certain ways. Here I’ll share eleven of my favorite ones. I know there are many, many, more* but as an apprentice programmer, these ones are particularly easy to use and I’ve been happy with them.
Continue reading…

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Early Observations from My New Podcast on Breaking Records

A few weeks ago I launched a new project called The Record Breaking Podcast (link to the podcast on iTunes). In each episode, I interview someone who has set or broken a significant record. Often these are world, first-ever, all-time records, though I do sometimes veer into records that may not be of that caliber yet are personally meaningful. I’ve interviewed four people so far and already I’m learning all kinds of interesting things Continue reading…

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Interviewed for the NYTimes’s The Upshot on Silicon Valley

The New York Times’s sub-brand The Upshot [1] recently did a piece called What It’s Really Like to Risk it All in Silicon Valley. The article follows Nathalie Miller, who left Instacart to start Doxa, a company in the recruiting space focused on getting women into technology firms. The piece includes commentary from a number of folks on the Silicon Valley experience, including Tristan Walker of Bevel, Julia Hu of Lark, and Jason Shen (me) of Ridejoy, talking about the often unspoken challenges of entrepreneurship.

As the writer Claire Cain Miller explained to me, her goal in following Miller for 6+ months was to tell the story behind the hype of the Valley, and show that doing a startup is not all about unicorn status, launch parties, and huge rounds of financing. I had fun talking to her and they even sent a photographer out to take a photo of me in DUMBO.

It’s a great piece and you can read the whole thing here.


[1] The mission of The Up Shot: making events in the news and things in the world clearer, so people can converse about them, and cut through the fog with a certain confidence, as when we say, “The upshot of it is…” (source)

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The Problem with “Where Are You From?”

In case you missed it, I wrote up the results of the Asian American Man study on Medium.com, where it’s been read by over 70k people. National Journal, an Atlantic Media’s publication, also wrote a great piece featuring the research in an article called: Asian Americans Feel Held Back at Work by Stereotypes.

Today we’re going to talk about a phrase. It’s a phrase you might use innocuously and infrequently, but one that many Asian Americans hear on a weekly if not daily basis, and can feel unfriendly, even alienating.

That phrase is “Where are you from?” Continue reading…

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My Reading Notes on The Advantage

I recently finished reading The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in business by Patrick Lencioni. You’ve definitely heard Lencioni’s other books: Death by Meeting and The Five Dysfunctions of a Team were two which popularized the trend in the late aughts of the business book as a fable.

This book is more of a typical nonfiction business book: a main idea broken into several components with tactics combined with stories and case studies from consulting engagement it’s plus personal anecdotes all rolled into one concise and clearly written book. Continue reading…